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LETTER TO EDITOR
J Res Med Sci 2020,  25:8

Viscous lidocaine solution versus lidocaine spray for pharyngeal local anesthesia in upper gastroesophageal endoscopy


1 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom; Anesthesiology Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Psychiatry, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Date of Submission07-Aug-2019
Date of Decision14-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance16-Oct-2019
Date of Web Publication20-Jan-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Reza Aminnejad
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_527_19

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How to cite this article:
Aminnejad R, Alikhani R. Viscous lidocaine solution versus lidocaine spray for pharyngeal local anesthesia in upper gastroesophageal endoscopy. J Res Med Sci 2020;25:8

How to cite this URL:
Aminnejad R, Alikhani R. Viscous lidocaine solution versus lidocaine spray for pharyngeal local anesthesia in upper gastroesophageal endoscopy. J Res Med Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 29];25:8. Available from: https://www.jmsjournal.net/text.asp?2020/25/1/8/276177



We read the article entitled “Viscous lidocaine solution versus lidocaine spray for pharyngeal local anesthesia in upper gastroesophageal endoscopy” recently published in your valuable journal.[1] When we are planning for an interventional diagnostic or therapeutic procedure, it is not an unusual practice to forget some necessary but out of mind aspects of patient care. Operating rooms or endoscopy units are familiar for us as physicians, but these places can be very stressful for unfamiliar patients. Such as effects of any other acute stress on our daily life, putting the patient in a stressful situation may limit the benefits of therapeutic intervention or it may influence the results of a diagnostic procedure. In routine anesthesiology practice, premedication is the main part of anesthesia care, and in this regard, administration of a benzodiazepine such as midazolam is the key element with the aim of anxiolysis and ante-grade amnesia.[2],[3] Midazolam can supply this aim.[4] Some physicians may refrain from taking such medications to avoid respiratory complications during the procedure, but limiting the dose of midazolam (0.01–0.03 mg/kg for intravenous injection) will be the patient safety guaranty.[5] Taking an appropriate anxiolytic medication is the absolute right of every patient who enters the procedure room.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Khodadoostan M, Sadeghian S, Safaei A, Shavakhi AR, Shavakhi A. Viscous lidocaine solution versus lidocaine spray for pharyngeal local anesthesia in upper gastroesophageal endoscopy. J Res Med Sci 2018;23:102.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Sebghatollahi V, Tabesh E, Gholamrezaei A, Zandi AR, Minakari M, Shavakhi A. Premedication with benzodiazepines for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: Comparison between oral midazolam and sublingual alprazolam. J Res Med Sci 2017;22:133.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
3.
Mosaffa F, Mohajerani SA, Aminnejad R, Solhpour A, Dabir S, Mohseni GR. Preemptive oral clonidine provides better sedation than intravenous midazolam in brachial plexus nerve blocks. Anesth Pain Med 2016;6:e28768.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Salimi A, Nejad RA, Safari F, Mohajaerani SA, Naghade RJ, Mottaghi K. Reduction in labor pain by intrathecal midazolam as an adjunct to sufentanil. Korean J Anesthesiol 2014;66:204-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Alizadeh A, Naseri M, Ravanshad Y, Sorouri S, Banihassan M, Azarfar A. Use of sedative drugs at reducing the side effects of voiding cystourethrography in children. J Res Med Sci 2017;22:42.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  




 

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