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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 107

Association of coronary artery dominance and mortality rate and complications in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention


1 Department of Cardiology, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran
2 Cardiovascular Intervention Research Center, Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
4 Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Alireza Abdi-Ardekani
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Street, Shiraz 71344-1864
Iran
Dr. Armin Attar
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Zand Street, Shiraz 71344-1864
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_414_19

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Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the treatment of choice for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Effect of coronary artery dominance on the patients' outcome following primary PCI (PPCI) is not fully investigated. We investigated the association of coronary artery dominance with complications and 1-year mortality rate of PPCI. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, patients with STEMI treated with PPCI from March 2016 to February 2018 were divided into three groups based on their coronary dominancy: left dominance (LD), right dominance (RD), and codominant. Demographic characteristics, medical history, results of physical examination, electrocardiography, angiography, and echocardiography were compared between the groups. Results: Of 491 patients included in this study, 34 patients (7%) were LD and 22 patients (4.5%) were codominant. Accordingly, 54 propensity-matched RD patients were included in the analysis. The demographics and comorbidities of the three groups were not different (P > 0.05); however, all patients in the RD group had thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) 3, while five patients in the LD and five patients in the codominant group had a TIMI ≤2 (P = 0.006). At admission, the median left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was highest in RD patients and lowest in LD and codominant patients (34%, P = 0.009). There was no difference in terms of success or complications of PCI, in-hospital, and 1-year mortality rate (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Patients with left coronary artery dominance had a higher value of indicators of worse outcomes, such as lower LVEF and TIMI ≤ 2, compared with RD patients, but not different rates of success or complications of PCI, in-hospital, and 1-year mortality. This finding may suggest that interventionists should prepare themselves with protective measures for no-reflow and slow-flow phenomenon and also mechanical circulatory support before performing PPCI in LD patients.


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