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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 106

Electrolyte disturbances in children receiving omeprazole for gastroesophageal reflux disease


1 Department of Pediatric; Child Growth and Development, Research Center, Research Institute for Prevention of Non Communicable Disease, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences; Department of Pediatric, Imam Hossein Children's Hospital, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Pediatric, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences; Department of Pediatric, Imam Hossein Children's Hospital, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Fatemeh Famouri
Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
Dr. Forough Derakhshani
Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_637_18

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Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the common gastrointestinal diseases with various side effects. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) drugs are widely used for their treatment and long-term ingestion, which results in an electrolyte imbalance. This study investigates the changes in serum magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium after long-term use of omeprazole in children. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016–2017 on 97 children and adolescents, aged 1–15 years, with GERD, in Isfahan, Iran. Enrolled were patients visiting a referral pediatric gastroenterology clinic (Imam Hossein and Amin Hospitals) examined by an academic pediatric gastroenterologist. Before and 4 weeks after omeprazole administration, clinical manifestations including lethargy, muscle spasm, dyspnea, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heartbeat and deep tendon reflexes, and Chvostek and Trousseau signs were recorded in a data-gathering form. In addition, fasting serum magnesium, calcium, sodium, and potassium were measured. Results: The McNemar test results showed that omeprazole can reduce sodium, calcium, and magnesium levels statistically significantly (P < 0.05), but potassium levels do not have a meaningful reduction (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Consumption of omeprazole might cause asymptomatic hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, and hypernatremia in children. Such side effects should be considered in the follow-up of children under treatment with this medication.


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