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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 6

Evaluating the effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on kidney ischemia–reperfusion injury


1 Isfahan Student Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology; Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Yousof Gheisari
Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 8174673461
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_249_19

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Background: Acute kidney injury is a high-risk complication in a variety of clinical situations mostly due to ischemia–reperfusion (IR) injuries. The novel idea of remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) was proposed to prevent serious ischemia sequels. To address the controversy of previous reports, the current study was performed to assess the effect of rIPC on kidney IR injury. Materials and Methods: Male BALB/c mice were exposed to either rIPC or sham intervention, 24 h before kidney IR. In two independent sets of experiments, rIPC was accomplished by inducing three cycles of 5 min ischemia with 5 min reperfusion intervals through the ligation of the left external iliac artery or infrarenal abdominal aorta. Kidney IR injury was performed by left renal pedicle occlusion for 35 min and simultaneous right nephrectomy. After 48 h, mice were sacrificed for the assessment of kidney function and structure. Results: According to the serum urea and creatinine, as well as histopathological measures, none of the exploited rIPC procedures could significantly protect against kidney IR injury. Conclusion: Based on our findings and the divergent results of previous animal and human studies, it can be concluded that the renoprotective effects of rIPC are minimal, if any, and are not robustly detectable.


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