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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 88

Blood lead levels in pregnant women referring to midwifery clinic in a referral center in Tehran


1 Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Department of Clinical Toxicology, School of Medicine, Loghman-Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Clinical Toxicology, School of Medicine, Loghman-Hakim Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Department of Pediatrics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Hossein Hassanian-Moghaddam
Department of Clinical Toxicology, Loghman-Hakim Hospital, South Karegar Street, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_72_18

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Background: Lead effects on children and pregnant women are grave, and screening tests would be logical to detect high blood lead levels (BLLs) in early stages. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were taken from the pregnant mothers who referred to midwifery clinic with further phone interview postdelivery. Results: In 100 patients evaluated, the mean age was 29 ± 5 years (median interquartile range gestational age of 33 [24, 37] weeks). There was a significant correlation between polluted residential area and median BLL (P = 0.044) and substance exposure (P = 0.02). The median BLL was significantly lower in those without a history of lead toxicity in the family (P = 0.003). The only factor that could predict the BLL levels lower than 3.2 and 5 μg/dL was living in the nonindustrial area. All pregnant women delivered full-term live babies. Conclusion: Positive history of lead toxicity in the family and living in polluted areas may pose a higher BLL in pregnant women.


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