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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 118

The relationship between food insecurity with cardiovascular risk markers and metabolic syndrome components in patients with diabetes: A population-based study from Kerman coronary artery disease risk study


1 Department of Nutrition, Cardiovascular Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical Physiology, School of Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
2 Physiology Research Center, Institute of Basic and Clinical Physiology, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
3 Department of Nutrition, Nutrition and Food Security Research Center, International Campus, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
4 Department of Nutrition, Nutrition and Food Security Research Center, Faculty of Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Mohammad Reza Mahmoodi
Haft Bagh-E-Alavi Highway, Kerman - 7635111167
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jrms.JRMS_12_17

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Background: We sought the prevalence of food insecurity and whether cardiovascular risk markers and metabolic syndrome components are significantly different in categories of food insecurity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 520 patients with type 2 diabetes from the Kerman coronary artery disease risk study aged between 23 and 87 years (60.8 ± 11.4) who selected by one-stage cluster sampling were assigned into four groups of “food secure” and “mild,” “moderate,” and “severe” food insecure. Household food insecurity was assessed by a 9-item household food insecurity access scale questionnaire. Results: The prevalence of food security and mild, moderate, and severe food insecurity in patients with diabetes was 24.4%, 33.1%, 28.9%, and 13.6%, respectively. There was a significant difference among the food-secure/insecure sex groups (P = 0.001). The prevalence of food insecurity and risk factors such as total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and visceral obesity in mild food-insecure females was significantly higher than males (P < 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). The fasting blood sugar significantly increased (P = 0.020) in diabetic females with food security than the other female groups. Diastolic blood pressure significantly increased (P = 0.028) in diabetic females with severe food insecurity than the other female groups. The glycosylated hemoglobin significantly increased (P = 0.013) in diabetic males with severe food insecurity than the other male groups. Food insecurity odds ratio in females was 1.74 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–2.70), 2.39 (95% CI: 1.48–3.88), and 2.73 (95% CI: 1.49–5.01) times higher than in males for mild, moderate, and severe food insecurity, respectively. Conclusion: Food insecurity may deteriorate some cardiometabolic biomarkers in type 2 diabetes. Improving food security in patients with diabetes may help reduce cardiovascular disease.


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